BIOMASS I Solutions that are practical and flexible

Biogas Plants and Equipment
Biogas Plants and Equipment

Our biogas plants and equipment are designed for various capacities and uses. For standard 2 m3/day capacity we offer “Sanjeevani” and “Sanjeevani-S”. Both these plants take animal dung or crushed food waste as inputs and produce about 2,000 liters of biogas every day. The capacity is equivalent to about 1 domestic LPG cylinder (typically 14 to 15 kg) every month.

For all other capacities and substrates, we offer custom-design products. The range of capacities includes biogas generation of 40, 50, 80, 100, 200, 500, 1,000, 3,000, 6,000 and 12,000 m3/day.

We supply not only the digesters, but also the ancillary equipment like H2S scrubber, CO2 scrubber, blowers, compressors, storage systems, dispensing systems, heat recovery systems, heating systems, fertilizer conversion systems, decanters, dryers, etc. as required for the solution being given to the customer.
Biogas for Cooking
Biogas for Cooking

This solution comprises a biogas digester of desired capacity working with specific substrate as input. It may or may not have H2S scrubbing system, depending on the quantity of H2S in the biogas and the requirement by the customer for cleaning it. As the heating value of biogas is almost half that of cooking LPG, specially designed biogas burners are provided to improve cooking speed. Depending on the demand by the customer, a blower to increase gas pressure may be employed.
Biogas to Elecricity
Biogas to Elecricity

The range of supply of biogas to electricity solutions is from 10 kW to 1 MW. All the components of the solution are provided with matching capacities.

It comprises the biogas digester system of the desired capacity, gas storage, biogas cleaning system to get rid of H2S from the gas, and the biogas genset. In the digester system, one may have a pre-digester or a feed mixing chamber or both. On the post-digester side, liquid from the slurry is separated and is recycled for feed preparation. It reduces the overall fresh water demand of the scheme. The digester itself may be temperature controlled and the input for the same could be given from heat recovery of the genset or from a solar heating system or from any other heat source as the case may be.
Biogas to Compressed Bio-methane
Biogas to Compressed Bio-methane

For the sake of demonstration of the concept, a compressed Bio-methane solution can be supplied for as low as 5 m3 methane per hour. However, considering the cost of the plant, it becomes economically viable only above 6,000 m3 biogas per day capacity, which translates to approximately 2,400 kg bio-methane per day.
Rural energy solutions
Rural energy solutions

Biogas is the most ideal solution for rural energy. Rural homes require cooking fuel and electricity and they are in need of a reliable electricity option that has a local source of supply. Moreover, considerable quantities of raw material are available in the rural areas for biogas production. Typical substrates, i.e. raw materials that can be used for biogas production in rural areas include:

  • Agricultural waste: Maize, jawar, bajara, rice, sorghum, etc.
  • Food processing waste
  • Sugar factory: Molasses, spent wash, and press mud
  • Industrial waste: oilcakes and de-oiled cakes, maize husk, starch effluent, etc.
  • Other waste: Kitchen and hotel waste, organic waste in MSW
  • Cultivated substrate: Napier grass, Elephant grass, Safflower, etc.

As seen from the figure in the link How it Works, after removing unwanted impurities, biogas can be used as engine fuel to generate electricity. If the purity of methane can be increased to over 90%, then the gas can be compressed to high pressures of over 200 bar and stored in cylinders. It can then directly replace CNG, even for vehicular applications.

The effluent from the biogas plant is in the form of slurry, called digestate. Liquid from the digestate can be separated by processes such as decantation or using simple techniques like a sand-bed filter. It could then be recycled into the biogas plant or can be used as nitrogen rich liquid fertilizer. The solid effluent is almost completely composted biomass. It can be used as manure. When minerals and micronutrients are mixed with the manure, it could be converted into fertilizer, which is a value added product.
Biodiesel
Biodiesel

Biodiesel is technically methyl or ethyl ester of fatty acids. It is derived from vegetable oils or animal fat oils. Biodiesel has physical characteristics and combustion properties closer to that of conventional “high speed diesel” (HSD) derived from crude oil; hence it could be used to directly replace HSD in engines. As the source of biodiesel is renewable, it can provide sustainable fuel. The emissions from these biodiesel engines are 20% to 50% lower as compared to those running on high-speed diesel. What’s more, engines running on biodiesel do not emit any sulfur.
Biodiesel engines run smoother, have better combustion efficiencies due to extra oxygen in the fuel and can take any blend of biodiesel and high speed diesel.

We have developed a batch processing plant for biodiesel production. The plant is capable of taking multiple feedstocksWe provide specific feedstock based process optimization to customers. The typical capacity of the plant is based on 10 tonnes per day of feedstock which translates to about 11,000 liters of biodiesel per day on a two shift basis.
Biomass to organic fertilizers
Biomass to organic fertilizers

Balanced nutrition is the base for a healthy plant. Amongst the different constituents such as silica, phosphate, potash and nitrogen, phosphate is one of the significant nutrients. Phosphate forms a major part of nucleic acids and is an energy source for the plant. Root growth, yield and absorption of potassium, manganese and nitrogen in balanced form depend on proper absorption of phosphorus.
At present this need is fulfilled the world over by using chemical phosphates. Phosphorus can be utilized by plants only when it is in water soluble form. Other forms of phosphates are citrate soluble and insoluble. Over a period, citrate soluble forms of phosphorus get converted into water soluble forms and can be utilized by plants.

Depending on the pH of the soil, the water soluble part of the conventional chemical phosphatic fertilizers gets converted into an insoluble form soon after it comes in contact with substances like iron, aluminum, calcium, or magnesium salts in the soil. The process is known as Phosphate Fixation. Fixed phosphate, which cannot be utilized, creates phosphate banks in the soil. These banks will remain unutilized for years together resulting in non-fertile land. As a result, typically about 70-90% of the phosphorus gets fixed and only 10-30% can be utilized by the plant.

Organic Fertilizer helps overcome the phosphate fixation problem. The base of organic fertilizers is typically humus, which is compost manure. Some herbal extracts and mineral phosphate are added to it as nutrients for microbes and the plants. The Organic Fertilizer provides phosphorous to the plant over an extended period in smaller doses as necessary for healthy growth. The humus, presence of organic carbon and lower pH create favorable conditions to avoid the phosphate fixation process. Eventually 90-95% of the total phosphorus can be utilized by the plant for its nutrition.

The humus makes the soil porous and rich in microbes. It is also observed that continuous use of Organic Fertilizer can make available over time the previously fixed phosphate. On application of Organic Fertilizers, considerable improvement in yield even up to 25%, have been recorded.

Recent developments in the technology have opened the possibility of using food grain and vegetable waste other than dung for biogas generation. Even the waste cake that is left after extracting oil from seeds can be used to generate biogas. Interestingly, the gas output of this starch or protein based feedstock is multi-folds than that of the cow dung.